Impacts of Exercise on the Immune System

We have a barrier that protects our body against harmful organisms from outside: our immune system. We obtain more and more information about the factors that affect the immune system day by day. Along with a healthy diet and regular exercise, the most emphasized issue as of recent is the “stress” factor.

According to researchers; individuals with a high stress load in their daily lives have a higher risk of depression and anxiety. Moreover, these individuals are also more prone to a life of less sleep, less exercise, and malnutrition. In addition to the direct destructive effect of stress on the immune system, it is suggested that it indirectly affects us in these ways as well.

Just thinking about an event is enough to activate the relevant regions of our brain. Researchers coincidentally found this situation with the signals they received from the region of the brain that led the arms of a monkey that was willing to catch a banana behind a glass during an experiment. Likewise, when we feel fear, the glands that excrete adrenaline are ordered to work. These thoughts, which are actually intangible in our inner world, demonstrate themselves quite tangibly in our bodies.

There are many ways to deal with stress. One of the most practical and cheapest ways is exercise. Regular exercise both suppresses stress and directly supports the immune system. Immediately after exercise, blood cells fighting harmful organisms double, endorphin levels increase and metabolic activities become regulated.

Exercise, which causes countless changes in our body, continues to have positive effects in other areas of our lives by increasing our motivation. As an example; people who exercise regularly state that they are happier in daily life, they feel better and their quality of life is better than other individuals.

You can also support your immune system with regular exercise at least 3 days a week for 30 minutes at moderate intensity, and as a result, reduce anxiety and stress factors for your physical and mental health.

Image: shutterstock.com [Romariolen]